Relative dating of the pennsylvanian period


13-Oct-2017 21:03

Among the earliest contributions to what could be called historical geology came from the Italian scientist and artist Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), who speculated that fossils might have come from the remains of long-dead animals.

Nearly two centuries later, stratigraphy itself had its beginnings when the Danish geologist Nicolaus Steno (1638-1687) studied the age of rock strata.

Historical geology, the study of Earth's physical history, is one of the two principal branches of geology, the other being physical geology, or the study of Earth's physical components and the forces that have shaped them.

Among the principal subdisciplines of historical geology is stratigraphy, the study of rock layers, which are called strata or, in the singular form, a stratum.

Precambrian time is so designated because it precedes the Cambrian period, one of 11 periods in the Phanerozoic eon.

The Cambrian period extended for about 50 million years, from approximately 545 Ma to 495 Ma ago.

Other important subdisciplines include geochronology, the study of Earth's age and the dating of specific formations in terms of geologic time; sedimentology, the study and interpretation of sediments, including sedimentary processes and formations; paleontology, the study of fossilized plants and animals; and paleoecology, the study of the relationship between prehistoric plants and animals and their environments.

Several of these subjects are examined in other essays within this book.

relative dating of the pennsylvanian period-66

Sex live chat virgin

It is one of the most challenging of geologic subdisciplines, comparable to an exacting form of detective work, yet it is also one of the most important branches of study in the geologic sciences.Earth's history, quite literally, is written on the strata of its rocks, and from observing these layers, geologists have been able to form an idea of the various phases in that long history.Naturally, information is more readily discernible about the more recent phases, though even in studying these phases, it is possible to be misled by gaps in the rock record, known as unconformities.The relatively brief span of time since the Phanerozoic began (about 545 million years, or Ma) has seen by far the most dramatic changes in plant and animal life.

It was in this eon that the fossil record emerged, giving us far more detailed information about comparatively recent events than about a much longer span of time in the more distant past.

Using Steno's law of superposition, they reasoned that a deeper layer of sedimentary rock was necessarily older than a shallower layer.